Video of the Week: “Beware! No Trespassing”

Our video this week revisits the Cowboy G-Men episode “Beware! No Trespassing”. It was first broadcast on November 1,1952. Timothy and Robert Lowery are stirring up some trouble at a tungsten mine.

I’d like to express my gratitude to all the folks who are rescuing these obscure television shows from oblivion. Even considering the poor quality of some of the prints (like this one), it’s still worth it to have some of Tim’s earliest screen performances available to us. Thank you!

Pic of the Day: “Change of Habit” revisited

And now for a long-overdue look at the rude and probably racist grocery manager of Change of Habit (1969), Elvis Presley‘s last feature film. He has just realized that the mild-mannered nun he just sold a mop handle to is in fact his crusading nemesis, Sister Barbara (Jane Elliot).

Change of Habit

Timothy was directed here by the late William A. Graham, who also guided him through Waterhole #3 (1967) and The Name of the Game episode “Fear of High Places” (9.20.68).

Pic of the Day: “Ain’t We Got Fun” revisited

Classic cinematic tough guy Ted de Corsia was born in Brooklyn, New York, on this date in either 1903 or 1905. He co-starred with fellow Brooklynite Timothy four times: in Crime Wave (1954), The Killing (1956), the Profiles in Courage episode “Andrew Johnson” (first aired February 28, 1965), and in today’s offering, “Ain’t We Got Fun”. That episode of The Untouchables was first broadcast on November 12, 1959. Here bootlegger Big Jim Harrington confers with Loxie, his pyromaniac torpedo.

Ain't We Got Fun - 1959

Following stage and radio acting stints, de Corsia hit the big time with his film debut, Orson WellesThe Lady from Shanghai (1947). He enjoyed a long career in films and on television in mostly tough-guy roles. He always brought a touch of class to his low-life bad guys, even if it was just a low-life’s idea of class. He passed away in 1973 of cerebral thrombosis; his ashes were scattered at sea.

Quote of the Week

I was a child laborer, as were my brother and four sisters. The family property rests on a half an acre with three buildings: the family residence, a guesthouse, and the studio. The studio was alive with production work for many years, and on the property was a bustling menagerie of more than a hundred farm and exotic animals that included chickens, ducks, geese, goats, horse, cats, dogs, birds of prey, and a monkey. The animals were the responsibility of the children, supervised by my mother and father. [...]

Like a farmer’s son, I felt compelled to follow in my father’s footsteps, or at least to facilitate the journey he had hoped to make as a filmmaker. As his right hand man toward the end of his life, I managed his career and helped produce and write projects with him. We were as close as a father and son could be; but I knew there were things about my father I would never comprehend or reconcile. I felt I had complete access to him in ways only a father and son could share. It was during these final years that a crystallization of understanding was formed which gave me the ability to better understand the underlying meaning in his artistic efforts. In The World’s Greatest Sinner, he was an outspoken smuggler. He had the ability to cultivate the shocks and hyperbole of tabloid headlines. Nothing escaped his scathing irony. His work was an antidote to complacency during the Cold War. American hypocrisy was always a major target. And to take on the subject matter of sex, religion, politics, and rock ‘n’ roll, he knew that he was playing a game so big that he wasn’t going to screw it up.

- Romeo Carey, “Making Sinner, A Work-In-Progress,” from Dead Flowers (Vox Populi/Participant Press, 2011)

Byron and Romeo

My husband Byron with Romeo Carey in Timothy’s El Monte studio, before the stone wall that Tim built himself, June 2013

Pics of the Day: “East of Eden” 1955 and 1981

Over a year ago I mentioned that I ought to do a side-by-side comparison of Timothy’s roles in both screen versions of John Steinbeck‘s epic 1952 novel East of Eden – the 1955 feature film helmed by Elia Kazan, and the 1981 television miniseries directed by Harvey Hart. So let’s do it already! Here are Joe the brothel bouncer from 1955, and the unnamed fire-and-brimstone preacher from 1981.

East of Eden (1955) East of Eden (1981)

It seems clear that no matter what the role, Tim knew how to command the screen. Well done.

Pic of the Day: “Finger Man” revisited

Today we take another look at Harold D. Schuster‘s Finger Man (1955). Henchman Lou Terpe annoys one of his boss’ b-girls (not sure who the actress is) with his Torgo-level groping skills.

Finger Man

During Eddie Muller‘s recent visit for the Noir City Portland film festival, I mentioned this film to him as a possible contender for next year’s shindig. He agreed that this is one film that deserves resurrection. Here’s hoping!

Video of the Week: Hubba Bubba commercial

Here’s one we haven’t seen in a while! In 1981 Timothy went to Arizona and filmed a commercial for Hubba Bubba bubble gum. It’s priceless.

Starring as the Gum Fighter is Western stalwart Don Collier. His sidekick is legendary character actor Dub Taylor, who appeared along with Tim in Crime Wave (1954). Big bubbles, no troubles!