Quote of the Week

In Elia Kazan’s classic John Steinbeck adaptation East of Eden (1955) Carey is a pimp/bodyguard for Jo Van Fleet’s character in a brothel she runs and is ordered to throw her son Cal (played by James Dean) out the door when he comes to see her. Right away you notice a spark of brutality and weirdness from Carey’s arrival onscreen. As preparation for his role as “Joe” the pimp, Carey tried mumbling all his lines because he thought it was “how pimps talked”. At a certain point Kazan got so angry at his annoying interpretation, he stabbed Carey with a pen in the shoulder. He and Dean actually became friends during the production. One day they went on a car ride through Salinas after which Carey stated he would never get in a car with him again due to his reckless driving habits. Dean would later die in what is now an infamous car crash.

Peter (just Peter), “Mad As Hell Heroes: TIMOTHY CAREY… What a Character!”; Furious Cinema, November 11, 2013

on the set with James Dean

Pic of the Day: “A Time for Killing” revisited

Ending the week and kicking off the Fourth of July weekend here in the US is another look at Billy Cat, the “Yankee from Missourah” of Phil Karlson‘s Civil War melodrama A Time for Killing (1967). Compare this to the iconic shot of Nikki Arano aiming at the racehorse from The Killing (1956).

A Time for Killing

As we just passed the 107th anniversary of Karlson’s birth, I thought it appropriate. Have a safe and sane holiday weekend, my fellow state-siders!

Video of the Week: “The Outfit” trailer

Today, on what would have been Karen Black‘s 76th birthday, we present for this week’s video another one from the archives. It’s the trailer for John Flynn‘s gritty crime drama The Outfit (1973). It features Ms. Black and Timothy prominently.

You’ve heard me say it before, but I’ll say it again – this one is essential viewing. Enjoy!

Pic of the Day: “Peeper” revisited

It’s way past time we took another gander at Sid, the hulking torpedo of Peter Hyams‘ genial homage to the hard-boiled detective flicks of the 1940s, Peeper (1976). Here he oversees his sidekick Rosie (Don Calfa) working over our hero, Leslie Tucker (Michael Caine).

PeeperAs previously mentioned, Romeo Carey and I got a great interview with Calfa two summers ago at his memorabilia-packed little home in the California desert. Stay tuned for that – it’s coming, honest!

Pic of the Day: “Paths of Glory” promotional still

Today’s pic is another promotional still from Stanley Kubrick‘s Paths of Glory (1957). Col. Dax (Kirk Douglas) is going over his notes during the court-martial of the three scapegoated prisoners (Timothy, Ralph Meeker and Joe Turkel).

Paths of Glory

My husband is especially fond of Tim’s rather rakishly defiant stance in this pic. I most definitely share that fondness.

Quote of the Week

The Early Days
It is ironic that a man, whose name is so widely unrecognized, could make such an impression on so many people. You don’t forget Timothy Carey. The infancy of Carey’s career consisted of small roles, often playing “the heavy” or a sideline thug. Yet, Carey’s presence could not be overlooked.

Carey’s film career started small and didn’t really get to grow much more as time went on. His first film role came in 1951, with an uncredited role in Billy Wilder’s noir film The Big Carnival [Marisa’s note: AKA Ace in the Hole. Timothy may have been edited out of the finished film, however.] From there he played another small, uncredited part in the William A. Wellman‘s rustic western Across the Wide Missouri. After working in some forgettable films and playing small, miniscule parts, Carey got his first chance to really shine.

In André De Toth’s gritty noir drama, Crime Wave (1954), Carey’s appearance comes late in the film where he oozes malevolence as Johnny Haslett. He then spends a good deal of time off-camera babysitting the protagonist’s wife. A testament to Carey’s creepiness on screen, the brief glimpse of him as Haslett is enough to keep audiences on the edge of their seats. Moving up from the number four thug to the crime boss’s right-hand man, Carey played Lou Terpe in Harold D. Schuster’s Finger Man (1955). Faithful to a fault, Carey makes the most of his small role, seething with pent-up penitentiary anger at the film’s wimpy hero.

Between his work in Crime Wave and Finger Man, Carey had a small part in the Marlon Brando vehicle, The Wild One. Carey was uncredited in the film, but even with the limited screen time and lack of respect he was given, he managed to turn in the most memorable performance in the film. With his spraying of the soda pop into Marlon Brando’s face, Carey carved his imprint into the minds of many, making his miniscule Chino Boy #1 credit much more than expected. And from there, his small but loud presence in many films to come, like East of Eden, Rumble on the Docks, and Revolt in the Big House, created the enigmatically fascinating actor that one can only call Timothy Carey.

– Sam McAbee, “Timothy Carey: Saint of the Underground”; Cashiers du Cinemart #12 (2001)

The Wild One

Video of the Week: “One-Eyed Jacks” trailer

This week’s video offering is another one from the archives. It’s a rather unusual trailer for Marlon Brando‘s sole directorial effort, One-Eyed Jacks (1961). It differs from most trailers in that it mixes stills with film footage, and in its length (almost 5 minutes).

Naturally, a major highlight is Timothy’s fight with Brando. “Get up, you tub of guts.” Enjoy!