Pic of the Day: “Head” revisited

Today we celebrate the 77th birthday anniversary of legendary Hollywood madman Jack Nicholson. As one of the scriptwriters of Bob Rafelson‘s Head (1968), he is at least partially responsible for the creation of Lord High ‘n’ Low, one of the strangest characters in cinematic history. Heck, he may be completely responsible for all we know.

Head

I especially like the cute couple in the background of this scene; they’re gazing at Timothy with obvious affection. How good would it be to someday interview Nicholson about his involvement in the film and his thoughts on Tim? As good as it gets. (See what I did there?) Happy birthday, Jack!

Quote of the Week

Timothy Agoglia Carey lived and died an underground legend.

The heavy-lidded, conspicuously tall actor crafted one of the most disjointed, overlooked and under-appreciated film careers in cinema history.

He was a man who refused to compromise, didn’t check his spelling, and never, ever listened to a goddamn word anybody said to him.

He wrote, produced and directed a play called THE INSECT TRAINER, which revolved around the power and the importance of farting.

He brought John Cassavetes over to his house, put him in a dog attack suit and let three rottweilers jump on him, while yelling words of encouragement from the next room, “It’s not you they hate, it’s the suit!”

Richard Widmark beat him up on the set of 1956′s THE LAST WAGON. Not to be outdone, in 1961 Carey was kicked in the ribs by Karl Malden and stabbed with a pen by Marlon Brando during the making of ONE-EYED JACKS.

He was one of the few actors Stanley Kubrick ever trusted to improvise a scene.

He faked his own kidnapping and ransom note during the filming of PATHS OF GLORY, just to get some press.

He led a life of strange brilliance. Carey’s passion for life blazed a trail of wide-eyed wonder that has been followed by such contemporary icons as Crispin Glover and Andy Kaufman.

Through all of this, and much, much more, he always remained true to the world he most definitely helped create and flourish: the underground.

- Sam McAbee, “Timothy Carey: Saint of the Underground”; Cashiers du Cinemart #12 (2001)

Paths of Glory lobby card

 

Pic of the Day: “Fade In to Murder” revisited

We wrap up the week with another look at Tony, the deli owner/frustrated actor of the Columbo episode “Fade In to Murder”. It first graced television screens across the nation on October 10, 1976. Poor Tony is merely a pawn in the elaborate plan set in motion by arrogant TV star Ward Fowler (William Shatner, in the puffy blue jacket) to silence his former lover, producer Clare Daley (Lola Albright).

Fade In to Murder - 1976

Timothy and Shatner had worked together previously in the Gunsmoke episode “Quaker Girl” (12.10.66). I’d dearly love the chance to ask him if he has any memories of working with fellow scene-stealer Tim.

Pic of the Day: “Chain of Evidence” revisited

You see this absolutely dreadful screen cap from a very poor quality “collector to collector” DVD of Chain of Evidence (1957)?

Chain of Evidence

Well, I’m happy to report that this film has finally attained that loftiest of goals – an official, proper commercial DVD release! You can now purchase the Bill Elliott Detective Mysteries collection, featuring Chain and four other films starring former cowboy star “Wild” Bill Elliot in his new role as LA County Sheriff’s detective Andy Doyle. I’ll be buying it myself as soon as possible, and replacing all of these substandard screen caps from Chain with shiny new ones. Good news!

Video of the Week: “Speedtrap”

This week’s video showcases Timothy’s best scene from Earl “No Strain” Bellamy‘s Speedtrap (1977). He first appears, quite memorably, at about the 4:26 mark.

Also featuring Joe Don Baker, Robert Loggia, Tyne Daly, Lana Wood, and Richard Jaeckel. Tim, Baker and Jaeckel were also in John Flynn‘s The Outfit (1973).

Pic of the Day: “Fast-Walking” revisited

Today we take another look at Bullet, the junkie con of James B. Harris‘ prison drama Fast-Walking (1982). It’s interesting how the shadow of Timothy’s profile is almost another character in the film itself.

Fast-Walking

Tim found himself playing a prisoner many times in his career. The role of the convict offers many rich characterization opportunities; perhaps that’s one reason why he appeared to be drawn to them. Bullet is certainly a piece of work. I do believe this is the only film in which Tim uses foul language on-screen. In this instance the character demanded it, but that was something he certainly didn’t need to depend on during his acting career. His personality was enough to make a statement.