Doris E. Carey 1940 – 2017

Very sad news to report, via Romeo Carey:

Doris Carey, 77, Mother, Actress, Poet, Theanthropist

LOS ANGELES, June 7—Doris Erica Radlinger-Carey, actress, poet, and best known as the wife of character actor Timothy Carey (they met in Germany in 1957 while Carey was making Stanley Kubrick‘s Paths of Glory), died on Wednesday at Arcadia Methodist Hospital. She was 77. Her son Romeo announced the death and said the cause was a heart attack.

Doris Carey’s acting career began with a part in Timothy Carey’s 1961 movie The World’s Greatest Sinner and 1969 TV series Tweet’s Ladies of Pasadena. Mrs. Carey was also a published author of a book of poems entitled Echoes of A Soul in Anguish.

Mrs. Carey was her husband’s writing partner on several movie scripts and plays, including The Insect Trainer. Mrs. Carey’s domestic life was filled with homemaking, gardening, knitting, animal rescue, and other philanthropic endeavors.

In addition to her son Romeo, she is survived by her five other children: Mario, Velencia, Silvana, Dagmar and Germain, and six grandchildren: Priscilla, Ambria, Kevin, Fiory, Akira, and Prima.

Mrs. Carey will be laid to rest on Wednesday, June 14, 2017 alongside her husband at Rose Hills Memorial Park in Whittier, California.

Quote of the Week

MARON:  Now, coming full circle, do you know – are you familiar with Timothy Carey?

GLOVER:  Yes! I went to his house – (laughs)

MARON (laughing): I knew it! I knew it!

GLOVER:  Yeah, I went to his house in the ’80s, late ’80s.

MARON:  Like, is he a role model?

GLOVER:  Well, there were two actors when I was studying acting – I could always detect, I could always figure out what the method, for lack of a better word, was that an actor was employing to get to their state. But there were two actors that I did not feel that way about. One of them was Andy Kaufman, and the other was Timothy Carey. And I never met Andy Kaufman, but I had the opportunity to go to Timothy Carey’s house, and it was a very, it was a really – it was really fascinating. I’m very glad I had that experience.

MARON:  When I, when I sort of started –

GLOVER:  Did you know him?

MARON:  No no no, but when I started thinking about you, and about, you know, sort of – not a template but somebody who was within the system and then started to kind of really break away in an extreme way, I thought about Timothy Carey, who I loved in some of the earlier movies; I’m not that familiar with his work, you know – 

GLOVER:  Well, have you ever seen The World’s Greatest Sinner?

MARON:  No.

GLOVER:  He directed it.

MARON:  Right, right. No, I know about the movie but I’ve not seen it.

GLOVER:  It’s worth seeing. I saw it for the first time at his house. He didn’t have it out on DVD at the time and he –

MARON:  That’s the one that Zappa did the soundtrack for, correct?

GLOVER:  Yes, I believe that’s right, yeah.

MARON:  What was your experience with Timothy Carey?

GLOVER:  Well, it was fascinating.

MARON:  Yeah. You were going there to figure him out, in a way.

GLOVER:  Yes.

MARON:  How did that happen? How did you get the opportunity to go there?

GLOVER:  A friend of mine, Adam Parfrey

MARON:  I know Adam Parfrey, I’ve interviewed him.

GLOVER:  Oh you did? OK great, great. Adam –

MARON:  It makes sense, it’s all coming together. Apocalypse Culture, the first volume, changed my life. And it seems like you’re kind of symbiotic –

GLOVER:  Yeah, he’s a great publisher. He’s in my first film, he’s in What Is It? 

MARON:  His father was a character actor as well.

GLOVER:  That’s right. That’s something he and I have in common. […]

MARON:  So he set you up with Timothy?

GLOVER:  Well, there was a friend of his, or somebody he was acquainted with, that had been in contact with Timothy Carey, and so that was set up so that the three of us went to Timothy Carey’s house. We were there for a number of hours.

MARON:  And what did you glean?

GLOVER:  (laughs) Well, um, (laughs) I’m trying to think if it’s right to say, but – (long pause) he was – (laughs) (long pause) (laughs) – the first hour was spent talking, Timothy Carey talked about passing gas, and the health of this –

MARON:  Uh huh. For an hour. 

GLOVER:  Yes. (laughs) And at first of course it was kind of funny, the first 15 or (laughs) 20 minutes it was funny. And then, and then – (MARON laughs) – it was very serious. He wasn’t doing it as a joke. And then it wasn’t really so funny (he and MARON continue to laugh throughout). And then it was kind of funny again. We were there for several hours.

MARON:  Well, you watched the film, right?

GLOVER:  Eventually – probably about two hours into it. We were at his guest house, which was larger than this and was kind of his studio, and we were out there for most of the time. Then we went into his living room and he showed us the film, which was excellent. It’s a very interesting movie. And then I asked him – what I noticed about him, I went and saw both East of Eden and…

MARON:  The Killing?

GLOVER: And The Killing. I think I saw The Killing a little later.

MARON:  Paths of Glory

GLOVER:  Paths of Glory I saw later. But I noticed when I was watching the films [Ed. note: The other film must have been One-Eyed Jacks]– you know, James Dean is one of those actors that you’re studying as a young actor, and Marlon Brando – but in those scenes, Timothy Carey has fight scenes with both of them in bars. But in those scenes, my eye was not on James Dean, my eye was not on Marlon Brando, it was on Timothy Carey. But the part that I hesitate to say a little bit but maybe I’ll say it – at one point – you hear a lot of different tales, I don’t know if you’ve heard a lot of tales about Timothy Carey, but I’ve heard a lot of tales about him that are fascinating. Like he disappeared during the shooting of Paths of Glory in Germany. If you look at the film, his character is in shadows at a certain point in the prison. But he wasn’t originally supposed to be in the shadows. He disappeared during the middle of production. I’ve heard different tales as to how he was found, but essentially they just had to hide his character and then they put him back in once he showed back up again. Also I think he met his wife in Germany there, and Kubrick did as well. So there’s something in common. But he kind of pointed at his head at one point and said – I almost feel like I’m betraying something private. He said something about his mental health. So it was fascinating to me because I realized that part of what was hard for me to detect about him was there was something going on, I gleaned or assumed from talking to him, that was essentially undetectable because he was having, for lack of a better word, mental health issues. And so that’s part of why I would say probably it was hard for me to detect what his specific method was. Like Marlon Brando, he’s a great actor but I can essentially understand what he’s employing to get to the state, or James Dean. But like I said, I never met Andy Kaufman so I don’t know exactly where it was coming from. And Timothy Carey, even having had that meeting of course, I don’t know the exact neurons, so to speak, for getting to that point.

MARON:  Well, you’re sort of one of those guys too. 

GLOVER:  Well, I probably early on have always been interested in the idea of art and madness, for the lack of a better word, as being good for art.

Crispin GloverWTF Podcast with Marc Maron #673 (01.18.16)

glovermaron

“The Killing” Comes to the Big Screen in Portland!

Tonight is opening night for the Portland edition of I Wake Up Dreaming, the excellent film noir fest curated by Elliot Lavine for nearly thirty years in San Francisco. Seven days and nights of film noir at Cinema 21! I’m thrilled to report that one of the films shown on the fest’s final day, March 23rd, will be Stanley Kubrick‘s classic heist thriller The Killing (1956), the film that truly brought Timothy to the attention of the film world. I’m also thrilled to report that I will be catching a few words on video with Mr. Lavine this weekend! If you’re in town, don’t you dare miss this stellar presentation! I may even try to do a quick Facebook Live video tonight, just to test it out. See you there!

Video of the Week: “Cynthy’s Dream Dress”

It’s Wednesday, and you may or may not remember what that means around here: it’s time for the Video of the Week! This week we bring you another of Timothy’s very early appearances on the small screen. It’s the Death Valley Days episode “Cynthy’s Dream Dress,” first airing on March 3, 1953. Tim’s very small part as a bartender begins at about the 10:35 mark. Don’t blink!

The episode also stars Virginia Lee (D.O.A. [1950]); Brad Johnson (Bedtime for Bonzo [1951]); and Helen Brown (Shane [1953]). Also appearing are two of Ed Wood‘s favorite character players, Lyle Talbot and Kenne Duncan. Enjoy!

Happy Halloween!

In what is turning out to be my annual Halloween pic, here once again is Timothy costumed as Frankenstein’s monster for the legendary early 1980s Sambo’s commercial that has apparently disappeared into the ether. It’s become my personal Holy Grail of Careyana. (Many thanks to Romeo Carey for including this in the work-in-progress documentary! That’s him on Tim’s left.)

Tim as Frankenstein's monster

Wishing you all a bang-up Halloween, just as Tim would have celebrated it! Stay safe and have fun!

Quote of the Week

THE WORLD’S GREATEST SINNER.  And  possibly the World’s Greatest Movie! Timothy Carey has the kind of flat-out sensual, deliberate brilliance that can scare the life out of a strong man. Like anyone who’s had the good fortune to experience this mammoth film…written, produced, directed and starring Mr. Carey… I’m in line to touch the hem of his garment. The awesome bombardment of philosophical / psychological / metaphysical messages in this tour de force goes 3-d one better, so to speak-this is the one film that not only SAYS IT ALL, but also manages to deliver the real truth about rock & roll and its place in a wildly undulating universe. To rockin’ rollin’ KICKS readers, TWGS is the ultimate R&R movie. To Joe Blow in the corn belt, it’s an incredible fast paced thriller with the wildest twists this side of Chubby Checker! Early on, we see leading man Carey as Clarence Hilliard, checking out a crazed crowd at a wild R&B show. Inspired, he takes up the guitar, changes his name to “God”, sports up in a fantastic gold lame suit (with “God” embroidered on the cuffs), and starts thrilling millions with his screaming rock & roll, dancing and preaching. With power, he becomes corrupt and careless, and the thrust of the film becomes a bizarre probe into the soul of man. The power and the glory of Carey’s performance come in the fact that, try as you may, you can’t bring yourself to believe that he is merely acting. Timothy Carey is, truly, genius personified. The movie is not only recommended, its required. Oh, and check this out, the title song is a reckless, stomping, lo-brow ’61 audio blaster that rates easily in KICKS HQ Top Ten Of All Time, even tho everybody here says pee-yew about the guy responsible for it – Frank Zappa!                                            
Miriam Linna, Kicks Magazine, 1992

The World's Greatest Sinner