Richard Anderson 1926 – 2017

Better late than never, folks. Richard Anderson, Timothy’s co-star in Paths of Glory (1957) (two years later they both appeared in The Gunfight at Dodge City, though not together), passed away on August 31 (my birthday!) of this year at the age of 91. He was of course best known for his role as Oscar Goldman in The Six Million Dollar Man television series. Romeo Carey did get an interview with him a few years ago, thankfully. As today is Wednesday, the usual day for Video of the Week, here is Anderson with Timothy in the memorable court-martial scene from Paths. Rest well, Oscar.

 

Robert Loggia 1930 – 2015

Well this is not how I wanted to end “Timothy in Color Week,” I can assure you. Robert Loggia, character actor and tough guy extraordinaire, passed away today at the age of 85. He and Timothy only made one film together, the drive-in classic Speedtrap (1977). To mark his passing, let’s share not only a pic from that film but a video clip as well.

Speedtrap

From Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) to The Sopranos (2004), Loggia marked whatever project he found himself in with the indelible stamp of his personality. He will truly be missed.

Charles Herbert 1948 – 2015

We were very sad to learn today of the sudden death on Halloween of Charles Herbert, child star of the 1950s and ’60s and Timothy’s nemesis in Bert I. Gordon‘s The Boy and the Pirates (1960). As it’s Video of the Week Wednesday, we dug into the archives and are re-posting this enjoyable video review of Pirates.

“Do you know who Timothy Carey is?” Herbert asked Classic Images during a 2006 interview. “He, on that movie [Pirates], probably scared me more than the Colossus of New York [laughs]! But he was a nice man, and he always tried to make you feel, ‘I’m not really crazy,’ and you would say, ‘Okay.’ And then he would walk away and you’d go, ‘He’s CRAZY!’ He was a scary man.” We wish Mr. Herbert peaceful rest.

Joan Leslie 1925 – 2015

We learned last week of the passing of lovely star Joan Leslie at the age of 90. Timothy was lucky enough to share the screen with her (and Sterling Hayden), however briefly, in one of his earliest film appearances. That film was Hellgate (1952), the entertaining Western prison drama written and directed by Charles Marquis Warren.

HellgateAlmost always the “good girl,” Leslie played against type to most memorable effect in the underrated noir thriller Repeat Performance (1947). An accomplished singer and dancer as well as an actress, it was always a treat to watch her practice her craft. She will indeed be missed.

Video of the Week: Frank Zappa on the Steve Allen Show, 1963 revisited

We received the sad news today of the passing of Gail Zappa, Frank Zappa‘s widow and the fierce guardian of his legacy. It seems appropriate, then, to reach back into the archives and re-post this video of young Zappa’s appearance on The Steve Allen Show back in 1963. He talks a bit about his involvement in The World’s Greatest Sinner (1962) and seems rather embarrassed by the whole thing. Then he plays a bicycle.

We send our love and support to the Zappa family, and thank them and Gail for protecting and curating Frank’s work for posterity. Peaceful rest.

Video of the Week: Behind the scenes of “East of Eden” (1955)

Sixty years ago today, James Dean lost his life in a dreadful automobile accident. Our video this week celebrates that short but incandescent life. Culled from the archives, it’s a rare collection of behind-the-scenes footage shot during the making of East of Eden (1955) in Mendocino, California in the spring of 1954. It can be found in the bonus material of the DVD release of James Dean: Born Cool (2001). Timothy just might be lurking unseen (or barely seen) in the background of some of this footage, but a very good glimpse of him starts at about 6:34 in – in case you couldn’t tell, he’s that tall drink of water dressed all in black, talking with a couple of fellows and chewing gum vehemently.

Today is also the perfect day to revisit Timothy’s reminiscences about his friendship with Dean during the making of the film. I often consider how much better off we all would be if both of these men were still with us.

Coleen Gray 1922 – 2015

We were saddened to learn today of the passing of Coleen Gray, a delicate beauty who became one of film noir‘s brightest lights (how’s that for a paradox?). The only film in which she appeared with Timothy (not together on-screen, unfortunately) was Stanley Kubrick‘s The Killing (1956). She also made her mark in Nightmare Alley (1947), Kiss of Death (1947), and Kansas City Confidential (1952). By all accounts she was one of the nicest women you could hope to meet in the City of Angels. We wish her peaceful rest.

Coleen Gray in The Killing

The Killing