Jack Davis 1924 – 2016

We were sad to learn yesterday of the death of long-time Mad magazine cartoonist Jack Davis at the age of 91. Jack made his mark not only at Mad but all over the world of illustration – advertising, album covers, film posters; you name it and Jack illustrated it in his own delightful style. In his honor we are re-posting a post featuring his renditions of Timothy from artwork for Waterhole #3 (1967). Thanks Jack, and rest well.

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It was announced today that veteran Mad Magazine artist Jack Davis will be retiring at the young-spring-chicken age of 90. To celebrate his amazing career, we thought it appropriate to re-post this entry from 2012. Thank you Jack, and take it easy – you’ve earned it!

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Today’s pics are artwork from promotional materials for Waterhole #3 (1967), featuring caricatures of the cast by the stellar comic artist Jack Davis. Timothy makes a great cartoon!

Tim by Jack Davis (Waterhole #3)

Waterhole #3

On the Occasion of Sterling Hayden’s 100th Birthday Anniversary

I usually don’t post on Saturdays, but as the legendary Sterling Hayden was born 100 years ago today, I couldn’t not post. Timothy appeared in three films with him: Hellgate (1952), Crime Wave (1954) and The Killing (1956), getting a chance to really interact with him only in the latter film. It’s too bad there weren’t more, but what we have is choice. Hayden was a true iconoclast, the very definition of “rugged individualism.” They just don’t make ’em like that anymore. Sir, we salute you.

Hellgate

Hellgate (1952), with Joan Leslie and James Anderson

Crime Wave

Crime Wave (1954), with Phyllis Kirk, Gene Nelson and Mack Chandler

The Killing (1956)

The Killing (1956), directed by Stanley Kubrick

Video of the Week: “Kidnap”

Well look what I found on Dailymotion! The full length CHiPs episode “Kidnap,” first broadcast on January 26, 1980. Most definitely one of Timothy’s most eccentric performances.

Tim’s cohort in crime here is Warren Berlinger, another venerable character actor born in Brooklyn (with the same birthday as me!). He’s been all over the big and small screens since the late 1950s. He is also Milton Berle‘s nephew!

Quote of the Week

Reservoir Dogs was dedicated in part to Lionel White, the hardboiled pulp novelist who wrote the source material for The Killing, among other film noir. Another member of this film’s production also linked to Reservoir Dogs is the actor Timothy Carey who played the sniper in The Killing. At 6’4” Timothy Carey was made to lurk and menace in the background but he was too kinetic to stay there. He was passed over for several big film roles (including Reservoir Dogs) because he had a reputation for being unpredictable and physically intimidating. Tarantino gave the role to Timothy Carey’s friend Lawrence Tierney, another brutish character actor.

Actors, particularly grizzled veterans of B-movies, have a special sway over Tarantino. As a rabid movie buff, his imagination is excited by the gruff, violent men who almost seem subhuman. Cretinous demeanors suggesting amorality are the stuff of Tarantino’s charm over an audience.

The Killing promo still