Video of the Week: The Eyes of Timothy Carey

This week’s video accompanies the wonderful article by filmmaker Andre Perkowski (and was also created by him) that provided our Quote of the Week last Sunday. It comprises scenes from Timothy’s last television appearance in the Airwolf episode “Tracks” (3.22.1986) overlaid with the audio from Morgan Morgan’s near-soliloquy from Minnie and Moskowitz (1971). The result is surrealism at its finest. Enjoy!

Happy Martin Luther King Day!

To celebrate the birthday anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and his legacy to the African-American community, I’m re-posting this entry from October of 2013. I still can’t get over these pictures. They are such a treasure.

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I am so. excited. to be bringing you today’s pics. Thanks to my new Facebook pal Juan Ibáñez Mateos, from beautiful Barcelona, Spain, we are presenting some candid photographs of young Timothy that I can pretty much guarantee you have never seen before. They were taken at an unknown venue by an unknown photographer sometime in the mid-1950s. It looks like there is some kind of song-and-dance talent competition going on. The Johnny Otis Band is going to town in the background. And Mr. Timothy Carey is owning the room.

Tim and the Johnny Otis Band, mid-50s

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The fellow who gave these pics to Juan was apparently unaware that Tim was even in them. They have a marvelous LIFE magazine quality. In the James Dean article from Movie Stars Parade magazine, Tim tells Dean that he spent a lot of time at the 5-4 Ballroom in Los Angeles. I’m willing to bet that these pics were taken there. And, of course, we’ve all got to wonder – did Tim win the competition? Eternal thanks to the unknown photographer, the friend who passed these on to Juan, and Juan himself. I am just blown away by this unexpected glimpse into the life and times of young Tim. I’ve been walking around with a goofy grin on my face since yesterday. It’s showing no signs of going away anytime soon. I hope you love these pics as much as I do.

Video of the Week: Frank Zappa on the Steve Allen Show, 1963 revisited

We received the sad news today of the passing of Gail Zappa, Frank Zappa‘s widow and the fierce guardian of his legacy. It seems appropriate, then, to reach back into the archives and re-post this video of young Zappa’s appearance on The Steve Allen Show back in 1963. He talks a bit about his involvement in The World’s Greatest Sinner (1962) and seems rather embarrassed by the whole thing. Then he plays a bicycle.

We send our love and support to the Zappa family, and thank them and Gail for protecting and curating Frank’s work for posterity. Peaceful rest.

Video of the Week: Bayou Dance by Bob Moricz

Our video this week is another great fan-created tribute to and re-imagining of Timothy’s crazy Cajun dance from Bayou (1957). The video was created and the music composed by Bob Moricz, a humongously talented underground filmmaker out of Sacramento, CA.

Says Bob about Tim, “He was one of those people who just kept popping up in my favorite movies and what a wild wild man. I learned so much about him on your website. It seems the more I find out about him, the stranger he gets. A true one of a kind and those are my favorites. Your website is a treasure trove. Thanks for all the hard work you put into it.” Thank you, Bob, and thank you so much for this wonderful video!

“Video” of the Week: “The World’s Greatest Sinner” by The A-Bones

Here’s another one from the archives, gang! OK, it’s not really a video. But whattaya want, it’s on YouTube, so that kind of counts. Doesn’t it? Anyway, presenting The A-Bones‘ stellar 1993 cover of the Frank Zappa-penned theme song for Timothy’s masterwork, The World’s Greatest Sinner (1962). And of course, that is Tim himself introducing the tune.

The A-Bones, from Tim’s old stomping grounds of Brooklyn, New York, are an awesome rock’n’roll band who have been together in one incarnation or another since 1984. Timothy’s introduction for their Sinner cover may very well have been his last professional gig, as he passed away a year later. Long live the true fart!