Pic of the Day: “Fade In to Murder” revisited

Ending the week is another look at Tony, the frustrated actor/deli owner of the Columbo episode “Fade In to Murder.” We first met Tony on October 10, 1976. Here he is being held up as part of an elaborate murder plan by arrogant TV star Ward Fowler (William Shatner).

Fade In to Murder - 1976

Another great Columbo episode (the last of the three in which Timothy appears), directed by the one and only Bernard L. Kowalski.

Pic of the Day: “Quaker Girl” revisited

Today we take another long-overdue look at “Quaker Girl,” the second of the two Gunsmoke episodes in which Timothy appears. This one first aired on December 10, 1966. “Buster” Rilla, the muscle behind a couple of treasure-seeking crooks, watches as killer Fred Bateman (William Shatner) tries to talk his way out of a case of mistaken identity.

Quaker Girl - 1966

Among Shatner’s zillions of impressive credits is that of Incubus (1965), one of a handful of films shot in Esperanto, a specially constructed language developed in the late 19th century with an eye towards fostering unity between nations. According to experts in the language, however, the actors failed miserably in pronunciation and delivery, and the film is not considered a good example of spoken Esperanto. It still makes me want to take a stab at learning it, though.

Video of the Week: “Fade In to Murder”

Our last video of the year is a full-length Columbo episode! It’s “Fade In to Murder,” first broadcast on October 10, 1976. It was the last of the three episodes of that well-loved detective series in which Timothy appears. Also on hand are William Shatner, Lola Albright, and of course, series star Peter Falk. Tim first appears at about the 9:55 mark.

Several folks have uploaded a bunch of Columbo episodes to YouTube, of varying frustrating quality. This is the best one I could find. Enjoy, and happy New Year, everyone!!

Pic of the Day: “Fade In to Murder” revisited

We wrap up the week with another look at Tony, the deli owner/frustrated actor of the Columbo episode “Fade In to Murder”. It first graced television screens across the nation on October 10, 1976. Poor Tony is merely a pawn in the elaborate plan set in motion by arrogant TV star Ward Fowler (William Shatner, in the puffy blue jacket) to silence his former lover, producer Clare Daley (Lola Albright).

Fade In to Murder - 1976

Timothy and Shatner had worked together previously in the Gunsmoke episode “Quaker Girl” (12.10.66). I’d dearly love the chance to ask him if he has any memories of working with fellow scene-stealer Tim.

Video of the Week: “Quaker Girl”

This week’s video is another full-length television episode. It’s “Quaker Girl,” the second of two episodes of Gunsmoke in which Timothy appears. It first aired on December 10, 1966. He is suitably menacing as Charles “Buster” Rilla, the part-Native American tracker to a couple of (literally) gold-digging bad guys.

Directed by the legendary Bernard L. Kowalski, and co-starring William Shatner and Ben Johnson, “Quaker Girl” is a serviceable example of the 20-season series’ middle years. Enjoy!

Video of the Week: “Fade In to Murder”

This week’s video gives us some highlights from the Columbo episode “Fade In to Murder,” first airing on October 10, 1976. Deli owner Tony is encouraging his friend Clare (Lola Albright) to think outside the box and try a different sandwich for once. Unfortunately, fate intervenes in the form of disgruntled TV star Ward Fowler (William Shatner).

Many thanks to friend of the blog James M. Tate for posting the video! This was the last of Timothy’s three appearances on Columbo.

 

Pic of the Day: “Quaker Girl” revisited

Our pic today revisits “Quaker Girl,” the second of two Gunsmoke episodes in which Timothy appeared. It was first aired on December 10, 1966.  Buster and I’m pretty sure that’s Dave (Tom Reese) are taking great pleasure in apprehending outlaw/sheriff’s deputy impostor Fred Bateman (William Shatner).

Quaker Girl - 1966

This episode was directed by the great Bernard L. Kowalski, one of the most talented and prolific producer/directors in television history. He directed Tim several times, and seemed willing to indulge him a bit as far as characterizations went. You know you’re in for some quality television when you see Kowalski’s name in the credits.