Pic of the Day: “Waterhole #3” promotional still

Today’s pic is my latest eBay find! It’s a publicity still for Waterhole #3 (1967), the rollicking Western comedy directed by William A. Graham. Paramount Pictures is more than happy to tell us that it features Roy Jenson, Harry Davis and Timothy, digging a tunnel in search of gold.

Waterhole #3

Davis was a familiar character actor who appeared mostly on television throughout the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, with the occasional film role coming his way. One of the most memorable of these was in Elia Kazan‘s America America (1963). His wife, Dorothy Salisbury Davis, was one of the best of a handful of women writing and publishing hard-boiled crime fiction in the 1940s and ’50s (and beyond).

Pic of the Day: “Change of Habit” revisited

And now for a long-overdue look at the rude and probably racist grocery manager of Change of Habit (1969), Elvis Presley‘s last feature film. He has just realized that the mild-mannered nun he just sold a mop handle to is in fact his crusading nemesis, Sister Barbara (Jane Elliot).

Change of Habit

Timothy was directed here by the late William A. Graham, who also guided him through Waterhole #3 (1967) and The Name of the Game episode “Fear of High Places” (9.20.68).

Pic of the Day: “Waterhole #3” revisited

Today’s pic gives us another look at Hilb, the (literally) gold-digging outlaw of Waterhole #3 (1967), directed by the late William A. Graham. Hilb wants to shoot something (or someone), and is unhappy that Sgt. Henry Foggers (Claude Akins) is preventing him from doing so.

Waterhole #3

“This was really demanding as I had to play a part-goat, part-human type,” Timothy once said of his role as Hilb. “I would react by making the sound of a goat to reflect different moods. There was a simplicity about that role that I liked.”

Pic of the Day: “Waterhole #3” revisited

Today’s pic revisits Waterhole #3 (1967), the easy-going Western comedy directed by William A. Graham, who sadly passed away last September. Timothy is a bad guy by the name of Hilb, who displays goat-like propensities to bleat and gnaw on carrots.

Waterhole #3

Waterhole #3 has been described as “a comic remake of The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly“. Hmm. Maybe, maybe not. It’s readily available on DVD and on iTunes, so you can check that claim out for yourself.

Pic of the Day: “Waterhole #3” publicity still

Our pic for today is a publicity still from William A. Graham‘s Waterhole #3 (1967), co-produced by an uncredited Blake Edwards. Timothy’s seemingly part-goat outlaw Hilb is on the trail of some Confederate gold, along with James Coburn, Carroll O’Connor, and Claude Akins.

Waterhole #3

Coburn, with whom I share a birthday, seemed to specialize in rascals and ne’er-do-wells that you nevertheless couldn’t help liking in spite of it all. He always managed to light up the screen, even when he was only voicing a character, as he did in one of his final films, Monsters Inc. (2001).

Pic of the Day: “Change of Habit” revisited

Greetings from Pasadena, California! Our pic for today revisits Elvis Presley‘s last feature film, Change of Habit (1969), directed by William A. Graham. Timothy’s unnamed and uncredited market manager pauses in his labors to chow down. He’s a real class act.

Change of Habit

More to come as our California adventure continues! This is Tweet’s Lady of Pasadena signing off. Toodle-oo!

Pic of the Day: “Waterhole #3” revisited

Today we revisit Waterhole #3 (1967), the amiable Western comedy directed by William A. Graham. Part-goat Hilb and Sgt. Henry Foggers (Claude Akins) are on the trail of some stolen gold – and they’re the ones who stole it. Long story.

Waterhole #3

Akins began his legendary career in an uncredited bit part in From Here to Eternity (1953), and he never looked back. He became a dependable mainstay in movies and on television right up until his death in 1994. It seems fitting that he became the epitome of the small-town sheriff, especially on B.J. and the Bear (1978-79) and its spin-off, The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo (1979-1981), being that his father was a police officer.