Video of the Week: TCM “The Boy and the Pirates” intro

Our video for this week doesn’t actually have Timothy in it, but he is talked about. It’s the introduction to the Turner Classic Movies broadcast of Bert I. Gordon‘s The Boy and the Pirates (1960) this past June during their Pirate Pictures Week. The presenter is actor and comedian Greg Proops.

It’s nice to hear Tim enthusiastically spoken about, isn’t it? Next week’s video will have him physically in it, I promise. Since he doesn’t appear in this week’s video, here’s a bonus pic from that very film.

The Boy and the Pirates lobby card

Pic of the Day: “Paths of Glory” revisited

Turner Classic Movies is observing the 100th anniversary of World War I all this month. Tonight they are airing Stanley Kubrick‘s Paths of Glory (1957), 5:00 p.m. PST, 8:00 p.m. EST.

Paths of Glory

Pvt. Ferol makes his painful way to the firing squad, accompanied by Father Dupree (Emile Meyer). You owe it to yourself to see this magnificent film if you haven’t already, or even if you have. It’s timeless.

Pic of the Day: “The Boy and the Pirates” revisited

Turner Classic Movies ends this month’s spotlight on pirate films tonight with Bert I. Gordon‘s The Boy and the Pirates (1960)! 7 pm Pacific, 10 pm Eastern.

The Boy and the Pirates (1960)

Morgan, that scurvy dog, will be very upset with you if you miss it. Very. So unless you’re in the mood for a red-hot poker in your face, take my advice – don’t.

 

Quote of the Week

For a weird, Z-grade movie, The World’s Greatest Sinner is remarkably prescient. In the ‘60s and ‘70s, there would be an explosion of God Hilliards out there. The Manson Family, the MOVE, the SLA, and Jonestown were all political and religious hybrid cults with charismatic leaders that led their followers into horrible ends.

The film’s music was composed and conducted by an (at the time) unknown musician from the L.A. area, Frank Zappa. There’s nothing in the music that is noticeably Zappa-esque, it mostly sounds like countless other swinging soundtracks from no-budget ‘60s films. Zappa briefly promoted the film during his 1963 appearance on the Steve Allen Show. There to show off his talents at playing the bicycle as a musical instrument, Zappa casually calls The World’s Greatest Sinner, “the world’s worst movie.” Zappa would later make the world’s worst movie, the unwatchable dreck known as 200 Motels.

The World’s Greatest Sinner failed to gain any wide distribution. For decades the film was the stuff of legend with rough bootlegs being passed around. That started to change with its initial airing on Turner Classic Movies – you can now purchase the film on iTunes. I first heard about it on a list compiled by Lux Interior and Poison Ivy of The Cramps where they ranked it their favorite film. Carey continued to work as a character actor in TV and films until his death in 1994, though he never completed another film as a director. He did work on directing Tweet’s Ladies of Pasadena, but the film was never completed and it has been said that the footage is unwatchable. Regardless, Carey has morphed into a full-blown cult movie icon. The Timothy Carey Experience is a regularly updated fan site dedicated to the legendary character actor.

As is the case with many no-budget, Z-grade films from the ‘60s, The World’s Greatest Sinner can be rough around the edges. The film does avoid the Z-grade pratfalls of padding the running time with stock footage to hit the 90-minute mark, running a tight 77-minutes. Even though Carey has worked with some of the greatest filmmakers in history, his work as a director varies from borderline incompetence to borderline brilliance. Even though the film isn’t the work of a cinema virtuoso, it’s an unusual, brave, and uncompromising work. Like its star, writer, and director,The World’s Greatest Sinner is truly one of a kind.

– Sean Mulvihill, “Reelin’ and Rockin’ – The World’s Greatest Sinner: A True Cult Film”; FanBoyNation.com, May 30, 2014

The World's Greatest Sinner

Pic of the Day: “The Outfit” promotional still

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Our pic today has nothing to do with that, however, unless you count Timothy’s being half-Irish on his father’s side. At any rate, today we present a publicity still from John Flynn‘s The Outfit (1973). Nasty thug Jake Menner is in full grimace mode during the big shoot-out with Earl Macklin (Robert Duvall).

The Outfit

The Outfit airs tonight on Turner Classic Movies – put down the green beer and pay attention, son!

Pic of the Day: “The Gentleman” revisited

Our pic for today (and need I remind you to click to embiggen?) is a rather beautiful shot of Timothy as hateful Tiller Evans in the Gunsmoke episode “The Gentleman,” first airing on June 7, 1958. He has just gotten punched out by Marshal Dillon (James Arness) for being abusive towards Boni Damon (Virginia Baker), hostess at the Long Branch Saloon. Boni will soon be finding solace with “the gentleman” of the title, dapper Marcus France (Jack Cassidy).

The Gentleman - 1958

Tim had worked the previous year with Baker’s then-husband, Jack Palance, in House of Numbers. Also the previous year, he got punched out by Arness’ brother, Peter Graves, in Bayou. Hollywood’s a small town!

PS: Catch Tim in Bikini Beach and Beach Blanket Bingo tonight on Turner Classic Movies!

Pic of the Day: “The Boy and the Pirates”

In honor of Turner Classic Movies’ upcoming showing of Bert I. Gordon’s The Boy and the Pirates (1960), today’s pic (click to embiggen) comes from that very film. Tim will make you forget all about Capt. Jack Sparrow, believe me. Best. Pirate. Ever. It’s also a treat to see Tim’s Paths of Glory co-star, the great Joseph Turkel, in this film as well, but unfortunately they have no scenes together. From Stanley Kubrick to Bert I. Gordon – wow.  Talk about going from the sublime to the ridiculous… (No offense, Bert.)

The Boy and the Pirates

What’s that you say? Tim’s shirt is open? Why, I hadn’t noticed.