Happy New Year!

All of us here at The Timothy Carey Experience (me, the hubby, and Cirrus the cat) wish you all the best for 2016! Thank you so much for your enthusiasm for the blog; it means the world to us. Here’s to another fabulous year! Have a wonderful celebration tonight; stay safe and, like Loxie here, party like it’s 1929!

Ain't We Got Fun - 1959

Pic of the Day: “Ain’t We Got Fun” revisited

Today we take another gander at Loxie, the fire-loving torpedo behind a bootlegger, from the episode of The Untouchables known as “Ain’t We Got Fun.” It first aired on November 12, 1959. Loxie is taking in a comedy show with his boss, Big Jim Harrington (Ted de Corsia) and Harrington’s moll, Renee Sullivan (Phyllis Coates).

Ain't We Got Fun - 1959

It still boggles my mind that Timothy received no screen credit for this rather important role. I can only imagine which higher-ups he must have irritated and what he must have done to irritate them to lead them to remove his name from the credits.

Pic of the Day: “Ain’t We Got Fun” revisited

Classic cinematic tough guy Ted de Corsia was born in Brooklyn, New York, on this date in either 1903 or 1905. He co-starred with fellow Brooklynite Timothy four times: in Crime Wave (1954), The Killing (1956), the Profiles in Courage episode “Andrew Johnson” (first aired February 28, 1965), and in today’s offering, “Ain’t We Got Fun”. That episode of The Untouchables was first broadcast on November 12, 1959. Here bootlegger Big Jim Harrington confers with Loxie, his pyromaniac torpedo.

Ain't We Got Fun - 1959

Following stage and radio acting stints, de Corsia hit the big time with his film debut, Orson WellesThe Lady from Shanghai (1947). He enjoyed a long career in films and on television in mostly tough-guy roles. He always brought a touch of class to his low-life bad guys, even if it was just a low-life’s idea of class. He passed away in 1973 of cerebral thrombosis; his ashes were scattered at sea.

Pic of the Day: “Ain’t We Got Fun” revisited

Today we take another long-overdue look at “Ain’t We Got Fun”, the episode of The Untouchables that was first broadcast on November 12, 1959. Loxie, the muscle behind bootlegger Big Jim Harrington (Ted de Corsia), enjoys a night on the town with Harrington and his moll, Renee Sullivan (Phyllis Coates).

Ain't We Got Fun - 1959

Timothy was well into shooting The World’s Greatest Sinner when he made this episode, which was directed by Roger Kay. Kay also helmed The Cabinet of Caligari (1962), based on the classic German Expressionist silent film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920). He gained a certain amount of notoriety when he apparently attempted to wrest the screenplay credit for that film from its rightful owner, Robert Bloch. Bloch described the ordeal (and his subsequent victory) in his autobiography, which just shot to the top of my must-read list.

Video of the Week: “Ain’t We Got Fun”

EDITOR’S NOTE 12/31/14: Another one lost to the YouTube banhammer. Sorry folks.

This week’s video is another one from the archives. It’s the episode of The Untouchables known as “Ain’t We Got Fun,” first broadcast on November 12, 1959. To me, one of the greatest mysteries of Timothy’s career is how he received no screen credit for this rather important role as Loxie, grinning pyromaniac torpedo to bootlegger Big Jim Harrington (fellow Brooklynite and frequent co-star Ted de Corsia).

Let me take this opportunity for a bit of shameless self-promotion! My burlesque persona, Loxie Arcane, is named after this character and Nikki Arcane, the sharpshooting racehorse assassin from The Killing (1956). What can I say – Tim inspires me in so many ways. Enjoy this great (and, near the end, rather surreal) episode; it’s in four parts so be sure to watch ’em all!

Pic of the Day: “Ain’t We Got Fun” revisited

Our pic today takes another gander at “Ain’t We Got Fun,” the episode of The Untouchables that was first broadcast on November 12, 1959. Loxie, the grinning pyromaniac muscle behind bootlegger Big Jim Harrington (Ted de Corsia), glares at Benny Hoff (Joseph Buloff), whose nightclub has been forcibly taken over by Harrington.

Ain't We Got Fun - 1959

Buloff and his wife were leading figures in Yiddish theater before ending up on Broadway, with Buloff later adding films and television to his repertoire. Upon his death in 1985, he left behind a rather impressive archive of his life and work which you can read about here.