Quote of the Week

Although some directors consider Carey “hard to work with” his talents have been used in devious ways many times. He’ll do an incredible screen test, they tell him “thanks but no thanks” and have another actor study his performance and copy it for the actual film! 

Timothy’s son, Romeo Carey, directed him in a 1988 short called THE DEVIL’S GAS. In ’89, Timothy, (along with Johnny Legend), was a guest on the L.A. public access program, Little Art’s Poker Party. He acted out scenes from some of his films, sang “Jambalaya,” talked about Dali and making wind and said, “The combustible engine has got to go. It’s like glorifying arsenic.” 

– Psychotronic Video magazine #6, Summer 1990; interview by Michael Murphy and Johnny Legend, research by Michael J. Weldon

The Devil's Gas

Pic of the Day: “The Devil’s Gas” revisited

We begin the last week in November with another look at Professor Petro, the bizarre lecturer from Romeo Carey‘s short film The Devil’s Gas (1990). His talk on “Dali and the Power of the Fart” sends the film’s sleepy protagonist into a surreal, nightmarish landscape.

The Devil's Gas

Timothy’s final film performance can be yours! Visit Absolute Films and snag your copy today (it says VHS, but no worries, Romeo will send you a DVD).

Pic of the Day: “The Devil’s Gas” revisited

Our pic today takes another look at Professor Petro, who confounds his students with a lecture on “Dali and the Power of the Fart” in The Devil’s Gas (1990), the short film directed by Timothy’s son Romeo. It was Tim’s last film performance.

The Devil's Gas

When I visited Tim’s studio last summer, Romeo showed me the boots Tim wore in this film – or more accurately, the boot. He only wore one because by this time he had had his first stroke, and his feet tended to swell up a bit. He was only able to get one boot on, so he wore a tennis shoe on the other foot. What looked like another of Tim’s eccentricities had its roots in practicality. Get yourself a copy of The Devil’s Gas at Absolute Films today!

Pic of the Day: “The Devil’s Gas” revisited

We continue our theme of Timothy looking scary for Halloween Week with this chiller from The Devil’s Gas (1990), the surreal short directed by his son Romeo. Professor Petro’s student is having a very strange hallucinatory dream… Or is he???

Tim looks like a Dia de los Muertos skeleton here! Get ahold of Romeo at Absolute Films and order yourself a copy of this gem today!

Pic of the Day: “The Devil’s Gas” revisited

Today we take another gander at Professor Petro, the very strange lecturer on “Dali and the Power of the Fart,” of Romeo Carey‘s The Devil’s Gas (1990). It was Timothy’s final film performance. Note the poster of Tim as Pvt. Ferol from Paths of Glory (1957) on the wall.

During my visit to the Absolute Films studio last summer, Romeo showed me the boots that Tim wore in this scene. Well, he was wearing one of them anyway. When I asked him if Tim did that on purpose as part of his characterization, he said no. Tim had had his first stroke by this time, and his left leg was a bit swollen as a result. It was difficult for him to get the boot on, so he just wore one boot and a tennis shoe. As it turns out, it’s a perfect representation of the Professor’s eccentricity.

Eighteen Years Without Tim.

Timothy died of a stroke eighteen years ago today. It is also the birthday anniversary of his hero, Salvador Dali. Coincidence? You make the call!

Tim looking decidedly Dali-esque in his son Romeo’s short film The Devil’s Gas (1990), his final film appearance

Amazing portrait by Dan O’Connor of Ace Kilroy fame!

Visiting Tim last September.

Timothy’s obituary from the New York Times, May 17, 1994.

May Timothy continue to entertain us, inspire us, enchant us, and make us think. Rest well, Tim. We miss you.

Pic of the Day: “The Devil’s Gas” revisited

Today’s pic is another from The Devil’s Gas (1987), the surreal short film written and directed by Timothy’s son Romeo. It was essentially Tim’s last film performance. He portrays Professor Petro, lecturing on Salvador Dali‘s famous essay on farting, and looking rather like Dali as well.

Timothy, always the iconoclast, took the subject of flatulence to heart. “Farting is no joke,” he often said. It was a natural function of the body, like a cough or a sneeze, and nothing to be ashamed of. His play The Insect Trainer was an expansion of this idea. “Live longer, live healthier, and let thy arse make wind!”