Video of the Week: “Encounter at Boot Hill” revisited

Here’s another one from the archives! It’s the Rawhide episode “Encounter at Boot Hill”. It was first broadcast on September 14, 1965. It features a priceless dust-up between Timothy and Clint Eastwood. It’s definitely one of Tim’s greatest television moments.

Remember – “impeeeeedin’” is against the law here in Regis. So don’t do it.

Video of the Week: “The Book”

Our video this week is the Rawhide episode “The Book,” the first of Timothy’s two appearances in that long-running Western series. He only appears at the beginning and end of the episode, an unwelcome presence in the life of Pop Starke (Pat Hingle). Unfortunately, there is no sound until about 2:30 into the video.

This is another of Tim’s television appearances that was directed by the legendary Bernard L. Kowalski. Enjoy!

 

Video of the Week: “Encounter at Boot Hill”

All right, I’ve been waiting for this one! Our video this week is the Rawhide episode “Encounter at Boot Hill”. It was first broadcast on September 14, 1965. It features a priceless dust-up between Timothy and Clint Eastwood. It’s definitely one of Tim’s greatest television moments.

Remember – “impeeeeedin’” is against the law here in Regis. So don’t do it.

Pic of the Day: “Encounter at Boot Hill” revisited

Starting off the week is another look at the Rawhide episode “Encounter at Boot Hill,” the second of the two episodes of that long-running Western series in which Timothy appeared. It was first broadcast on September 14, 1965. Crooked Sheriff Blaine (Simon Oakland) and his ill-tempered deputy Ed Walker are harboring a deadly secret.

Encounter at Boot Hill - 1965

Oakland was one of the most recognizable character actors around, working steadily from the 1950s right up until his death in 1983. He got into acting on Broadway in the 1940s after a stint as a concert violinist. He was especially memorable as the psychiatrist who explains Norman Bates’ psychosis in Alfred Hitchcock‘s Psycho (1960).

Pic of the Day: “The Book” revisited

Our pic for today takes another look at the Rawhide episode “The Book,” first airing on January 8, 1965. Pop Starke (Pat Hingle) is trying the patience of Carl Hatcher, the villain (big surprise, eh?).

The Book - 1965

Hingle was a familiar presence in films and on television from the 1950s all the way up until his death in 2009. He seemed to be equally adept at playing good guys and bad guys. His rascally personality gave a likeable edge even to his villains. He almost died in the late 1950s when he took a 50-foot plunge down an elevator shaft while attempting to escape a stalled elevator in his apartment building.

Pic of the Day: “Encounter at Boot Hill” revisited

Today’s pic is another from “Encounter at Boot Hill,” the episode of Rawhide that first aired on September 14, 1965. Ill-tempered deputy Ed Walker is being restrained from punching out spineless Jethroe Kane (Peter Haskell).

Encounter at Boot Hill - 1965

Harvard man Haskell received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature and was on his way to Columbia Law School when he appeared off-Broadway in The Love Nest. He forged a solid career in television from the 1960s up until his death in 2010. In the early 1980s he finally attended New York Law School while working in the city in soap operas.

Pic of the Day: “He’ll Never See Daylight” revisited

Today’s pic takes another look at Matty Trifon, the glove-wearing, chicken-loving mobster of “He’ll Never See Daylight,” the inaugural episode of Baretta that first aired on January 17, 1975. Matty is in a somber mood as takes a phone call from his boss Frank Cassell (Joseph Mascolo) to discuss that pest Baretta (Robert Blake).

He'll Never See Daylight - 1975

Television legend Bernard L. Kowalski directed this episode. He also directed Timothy in the Rawhide episode “The Book” (1.8.1965), the Gunsmoke episode “Quaker Girl” (12.10.1966), the Columbo episode “Fade In to Murder” (10.10.1976), and the TV movie Nightside (1980). I’m guessing he had a few tales to tell about working with Tim! I wish I could have had a chance to talk to him before he passed away in 2007.