Quote of the Week

THE KILLING

Carey was called ‘Kubrick’s good luck charm’ by one critic, but just made two blinding appearances in his films, as a doomed private in Paths of Glory and the ace sharpshooter in The Killing. Their relationship ended when Kubrick left One Eyed Jacks with Brando taking over and the pen-stabbing not far away. The scene here with TC holding a puppy is particularly intense and weird, while his interaction with the African-American parking lot attendant is almost too much to stomach. Carey was upset when Kubrick fled to England and left him behind. A shame, he would have been amazing in Strangelove.

Dale Shaw, “Five Reasons to Love Timothy Carey”; Sabotage Times, 5 June 2012

The Killing

Pic of the Day: “One-Eyed Jacks” transparency

Whoa everybody, I apologize for being away most of this week! I got sidelined with a bad cold. Today, though, I am back with something really special. I promise to post a better scan of this as soon as I figure out how to scan transparencies (apparently I have to make a folded paper doohickey… well anyway). For now, I’m using the pic that accompanied the eBay auction I got this from. It’s an original transparency of a behind-the-scenes shot from One-Eyed Jacks (1961), featuring Timothy and his director/star, Marlon Brando. And they’re laughing!

One-Eyed Jacks

Poor Margarita Cordova can be seen on the left. I owe a really good high-quality scan of this to my pal Toby of 50 Westerns From the 50s, who brought this auction to my attention, for the book he’s writing on the filming of Jacks. This is another one of those rarities of Careyana that brings a smile to my face. Hope you feel the same.

 

Quote of the Week

Timothy Agoglia Carey lived and died an underground legend.

The heavy-lidded, conspicuously tall actor crafted one of the most disjointed, overlooked and under-appreciated film careers in cinema history.

He was a man who refused to compromise, didn’t check his spelling, and never, ever listened to a goddamn word anybody said to him.

He wrote, produced and directed a play called THE INSECT TRAINER, which revolved around the power and the importance of farting.

He brought John Cassavetes over to his house, put him in a dog attack suit and let three rottweilers jump on him, while yelling words of encouragement from the next room, “It’s not you they hate, it’s the suit!”

Richard Widmark beat him up on the set of 1956’s THE LAST WAGON. Not to be outdone, in 1961 Carey was kicked in the ribs by Karl Malden and stabbed with a pen by Marlon Brando during the making of ONE-EYED JACKS.

He was one of the few actors Stanley Kubrick ever trusted to improvise a scene.

He faked his own kidnapping and ransom note during the filming of PATHS OF GLORY, just to get some press.

He led a life of strange brilliance. Carey’s passion for life blazed a trail of wide-eyed wonder that has been followed by such contemporary icons as Crispin Glover and Andy Kaufman.

Through all of this, and much, much more, he always remained true to the world he most definitely helped create and flourish: the underground.

– Sam McAbee, “Timothy Carey: Saint of the Underground”; Cashiers du Cinemart #12 (2001)

Paths of Glory lobby card

 

Pic of the Day: “One-Eyed Jacks” promotional still

Today we observe the 90th birthday anniversary of the legendary Marlon Brando. Timothy appeared with him twice, in The Wild One (1953) and One-Eyed Jacks (1961). Here is a rarely seen promo still from that latter film that I received from friend of the blog Toby Roan, author of the forthcoming A Million Feet of Film: The Making of One-Eyed Jacks. In a scene not appearing in the final cut of the film, the dead body of ne’er-do-well Howard Tetley is carried away by Rio, the man who shot him (Brando), Chico (Larry Duran) and Sheriff Dad Longworth (Karl Malden).

One-Eyed Jacks (1961)

 

“You know, I was always a hound for publicity,” Tim said in the Psychotronic interview. “They were doing the Academy Awards and Brando was up for it. Well, I knew him from The Wild One, I knew he was going to get it (for On the Waterfront), so I was getting dressed up for it and I was going to go up there and get it before he got there, but some guy from Western Costume who was dressing me up talked me out of it.” I think most of us secretly – or perhaps not so secretly – wish he had gone ahead with his dastardly plan. Sending afterlife birthday greetings to you, Mr. Brando!

Quote of the Week

Carey’s true nature, belying his odious on-screen behavior, came out in the easygoing way he talked about the many leads he’s worked with, actors who’ve routinely – and literally – kicked him around. He was given the cold shoulder by Robert Ryan on Alaska Seas (1954), “cursed and stomped on” by Richard Widmark during The Last Wagon (1956), and kicked in the ribs by Karl Malden during the filming of Marlon Brando‘s One-Eyed Jacks (1961) – to name only a few instances! When asked to reflect on these incidents, a sad fondness crept into Carey’s voice as he had nothing but praise for the many actors whose resentfulness instilled in him a real martyrdom rather than bitterness: “I’ve been fired from several shows. I’m not proud of it, but I do hold the all-time record.”

Ara Corbett, “Rebels With a Cause: The Timothy Carey-John Cassavetes Partnership”; Filmfax magazine #56 (May/June 1996)

One-Eyed Jacks

Karl Malden literally kicks Timothy’s ass in a scene that didn’t make the final cut of One-Eyed Jacks

Quote of the Week

You know, I was always a hound for publicity. They were doing the Academy Awards and Brando was up for it. Well, I knew him from The Wild One, I knew he was going to get it (for On the Waterfront), so I was getting dressed up for it and I was going to go up there and get it before he got there, but some guy from Western Costume who was dressing me up talked me out of it.

Psychotronic Video magazine #6, Summer 1990; interview by Michael Murphy and Johnny Legend, research by Michael J. Weldon

Congratulations to all of tonight’s Oscar winners!

The Wild One

Video of the Week: “The Wild One”

In honor of the legendary Lee Marvin‘s 90th birthday anniversary, we present the famous fight scene from The Wild One (1953), directed by Laslo Benedek. Timothy, uncredited as an enthusiastic member of Chino’s gang, sits on his motorcycle observing Chino as he eggs on Johnny (Marlon Brando). Later on during the fight, he splashes the contents of a bottle of beer over Chino while urging him to get up and finish Johnny off. This has been referred to in some quarters as the “throwing beer on Brando” incident.

Actually, as you can see, Marvin is the only one who actually gets beer thrown on him. Tim gestures a little too wildly with bottle in hand, and Brando gets a few drops on him. As Timothy mentioned in the James Dean article, “I played the scene with enthusiasm, but Brando didn’t seem to appreciate it. He finally turned to director Laslo Benedek and said, ‘Get that guy off the set. He makes me nervous.’” When Brando directed Tim years later in One-Eyed Jacks (1961), he told him, “Just don’t throw beer on me again, OK?” Tim replied, “If I do, Marlon, it’ll be good beer; it’ll be German beer.”

Pic of the Day: “One-Eyed Jacks” behind the scenes still

Today’s pic comes to us courtesy of our friend Toby Roan of the great 50 Westerns From The 50s blog. Toby is also the author of the work-in-progress A Million Feet of Film: The Making of One-Eyed Jacks. He sent me this amazing still a while back. It’s a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the shooting of the whipping scene from that film. Even though Timothy’s character doesn’t appear in this scene, being dead and all, we are fairly certain that that is Tim sitting on the ground at the upper right of the photo.

Behind the scenes - One-Eyed Jacks

We’re not exactly sure what that is he’s holding; looks like some kind of measuring instrument. In the foreground are, of course, Marlon Brando and Karl Malden. I for one am anxious to read Toby’s finished work. It’s bound to be something special!

Pic of the Day: “Quaker Girl” revisited

Today’s pic takes another look at “Quaker Girl,” the second of two episodes of Gunsmoke in which Timothy appears. It was first broadcast on December 10, 1966. Opportunistic bad guys Dave Westerfeldt (Tom Reese) and Vern Morland (Ben Johnson) rely on their part-Indian tracker “Buster” Rilla to help them nab a killer.

Quaker Girl - 1966

Johnson and Timothy had previously both appeared in Marlon Brando‘s One-Eyed Jacks (1961), though not on-screen together. Johnson was certainly one of the greatest Western stars who ever lived. If he seemed like an authentic cowboy on-screen, that’s because he was one off-screen as well. He was ever at home in the saddle, having been discovered in 1940 in his home state of Oklahoma by Howard Hughes while he was a rodeo rider and ranch hand. Hughes hired him to run a herd of horses to California, Johnson ended up sticking around, and his Hollywood career began. He returned briefly to rodeo riding in 1953, but the pay in Hollywood was a lot better, so back he went. His father, Ben Johnson Sr., was also a champion steer roper and a legend in the rodeo world.

Quote of the Week

Timothy Agoglia Carey is directing a play in Hollywood this month about death by farting [The Insect Trainer]. He’s been acting in films since 1951, was in classics with Brando and Dean, worked several times each for Kubrick and Cassavetes, was in the exploitation classic POOR WHITE TRASH [aka Bayou pre-exploitation] and made a movie that would be a cult classic if only people could see it – WORLD’S GREATEST SINNER. In various books, the 6’4″, now 65 year old [sic – he was actually 61 at the time of this interview] Carey has been called “a heavy eyed character actor, often a loathsome villain”, “totally without attractive characteristics, repulsive looking”, and “the least lovable actor since Rondo Hatton“. He’s also considered a great actor and his fans in the business include Jack Nicholson, Peter Falk and Brando. Here, often in his own words, is the Timothy Carey story.

Psychotronic Video magazine #6, Summer 1990; interview by Michael Murphy and Johnny Legend, research by Michael J. Weldon

Timothy with Michael Murphy, 1989

Timothy with Michael Murphy, 1989