Pic of the Day: “The Odds Against Donald Jordan” revisited

Once again by request of my dear husband, we take another look at Moose, the hep-cat bookie of the Mannix episode “The Odds Against Donald Jordan”. We first met Moose on March 1, 1969. Here he discusses the gambling history of the aforementioned Mr. Jordan with a none-too-pleased Mannix (Mike Connors).

Mannix  - 1969

As I’ve previously lamented, it’s too bad some savvy producer didn’t see the potential in a Moose spin-off series. He never returned to Mannix either. A low-down dirty shame.

Pic of the Day: “The Odds Against Donald Jordan” revisited

By special request (the hubby’s), today we start off the week with another look at Moose, the far-out bookie of the Mannix episode “The Odds Against Donald Jordan,” first airing on March 1, 1969.

The Odds Against Donald Jordan - 1969

Moose could have been the Rooster or Huggy Bear of Mannix, if some far-sighted producer had been paying attention. Alas, it was not meant to be.

Pic of the Day: “The Odds Against Donald Jordan” revisited

OK, I promise – not another April Fools post like last year. Just a regular pic o’the day, this time from “The Odds Against Donald Jordan”, the Mannix episode that was first aired on March 1, 1969. Groovy bookie Moose gets a load of his old pal Mannix (Mike Connors).

The Odds Against Donald Jordan - 1969

At the helm for this episode was Stuart Hagmann, who enjoyed a brief career in television directing commercials, episodes of Mannix, Mission Impossible and Bronk, and several TV movies. He also directed the occasional feature film, most notably the student protest drama The Strawberry Statement (1970). He was apparently recently interviewed for the Mondo Film Podcast, but the posting has disappeared.

Pic of the Day: “The Odds Against Donald Jordan” revisited

Our pic today takes another gander at Moose, Mannix’s hepcat bookie pal from “The Odds Against Donald Jordan,” the Mannix episode that was first broadcast on March 1, 1969.

The Odds Against Donald Jordan - 1969

I say it every time, but it’s true – how awesome would it have been for Moose to have had his own spin-off series? As awesome as it gets, that’s how awesome.

Video of the Week: “The Odds Against Donald Jordan”

In our continuing quest to re-post all the videos we’ve already posted because there aren’t anymore to post, this week’s video is Timothy’s performance in its entirety from the Mannix episode “The Odds Against Donald Jordan”. It first aired on March 1, 1969. Mannix (Mike Connors) pays a visit to his hipster bookie pal Rasmussen, affectionately known as Moose.

How awesome would it have been to have Moose as a recurring character on the show? Alas, it was not to be. “Come around and see me, dad! Dig?”

Pic of the Day: “The Odds Against Donald Jordan” revisited

Today we revisit Tim’s priceless cameo as Moose, hep-cat bookie and Mannix’s old gambling pal, of the Mannix episode “The Odds Against Donald Jordan.” It was first broadcast on March 1, 1969. He is encouraging Mannix (Mike Connors) to “Come and see me, dad! You dig?”, imitating the shake and throw of the dice.

The Odds Against Donald Jordan - 1969

Connors, born Krekor Ohanian (he’s of Armenian descent), was known as Touch Connors during his early career, a nickname he acquired during his college basketball days. He recently sued CBS/Paramount, claiming that he has never received any royalties from Mannix. I can’t seem to find any word on the results of the suit.

Quote of the Week

This is from the extras (Film Noir Web, disc 2) on the Reservoir Dogs (1992) tenth anniversary special edition DVD 2-disc set. The Kazan and Brando stories are apocryphal; Timothy always denied they took place. Also, Tim passed away not on his own birthday (March 11), but on the birthday of one of his heroes, Salvador Dali.

TIMOTHY (William) CAREY (1929-1994)

A lanky, saturnine character actor most famous for his work with Stanley Kubrick in PATHS OF GLORY… and most infamous for being the only man director Elia Kazan ever physically attacked on-set. Marlon Brando stabbed Carey with a pen on the set of ONE-EYED JACKS. John Cassavetes, who cast Carey in THE KILLING OF A CHINESE BOOKIE, declared that the actor had “the brilliance of Eisenstein” – after Carey put Cassavetes in a padded suit and turned an attack dog loose on him, during the actor/director’s first visit to his home.

Carey’s six-foot-five stature and laconic demeanor served him well in a number of tough-guy and character bits, and he later become a television regular on such shows as MANNIX, BARETTA, ELLERY QUEEN and CHiPS. He was apprehended scaling the fence at 20th Century-Fox in full armor, just to audition for PRINCE VALIANT, and later faked his own kidnapping while in Germany, during the shooting of PATHS OF GLORY.

His magnum opus was THE WORLD’S GREATEST SINNER (1962) – made nearly single-handedly over three years and released in 1962. Carey wrote the story of an insurance salesman who goes into politics and develops a God complex, then directed and starred. It featured a score by iconoclastic genius Frank Zappa. A second feature, TWEET’S LADIES OF PASADENA, remained in production from 1972 onward (Carey turned down a role in THE GODFATHER to work on it), but was never completed.

Carey also appeared in Kubrick’s THE KILLING, EAST OF EDEN, CRIME WAVE, and THE OUTFIT.

He died of a stroke on his own birthday, May 11, 1994.

Cassavetes directing Tim in The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976)