Pic of the Day: “Home to Methuselah” revisited

Our pic today revisits one of Timothy’s most underrated performances, that of doomed outlaw Zach Ontro in “Home to Methuselah,” the episode of The Virginian that first aired on November 26, 1969. Ontro is on the run with Jase Dubbins (Anthony D. Call, with whom I share a birthday; he’s also the son of the episode’s director, Abner Biberman).

Home to Methuselah - 1969

I’ve finally deduced that The Virginian has been released on DVD in its entirety, so I will soon be able to replace these dreadful-quality pics. Stay tuned!

Pic of the Day: “Home to Methuselah” revisited

Today we take another look at the long-running Western series The Virginian and the episode “Home to Methuselah,” which was first broadcast on November 26, 1969. Outlaws in hiding Zach Ontro and Jase Dubbins (Anthony D. Call) ponder their futures. Ontro is especially adamant in warning Dubbins about the dangers of women, “with their hair hangin’ long,” snaring men into tepid domesticity. It brings a weird kind of subtext to the scene.

Home to Methuselah - 1969

Call was directed in this episode by his father, Abner Biberman. Trekkies will remember Call as the overheated Lt. Bailey in the original series episode “The Corbomite Maneuver” (11.10.66). He later became a popular soap opera star. He and I also happen to share the same birthday – August 31! Virgos rule!

Pic of the Day: “Home to Methuselah” revisited

Our pic for today (and don’t forget for all pics, you may click to embiggen) is another from “Home to Methuselah,” the episode of The Virginian that was first broadcast on November 26, 1969. It’s always good to see Timothy laughing, even if it’s the desperate laugh of a doomed outlaw.

Home to Methuselah - 1969

Tim must have gotten a firm hand from director Abner Biberman, for this is one of his most straight-ahead, low-key (and yet extremely effective) performances. Tim appreciated and in fact needed strong guidance from his directors, or he tended to feel rather lost. At the same time, he seemed to work best with directors who were willing to let him improvise and embellish his characters as he saw fit. Biberman was up to the task; he was another hard-working television director who began his career as a character actor in the 1930’s. I’m willing to bet the two men related to one another.