Video of the Week: “Cynthy’s Dream Dress”

It’s Wednesday, and you may or may not remember what that means around here: it’s time for the Video of the Week! This week we bring you another of Timothy’s very early appearances on the small screen. It’s the Death Valley Days episode “Cynthy’s Dream Dress,” first airing on March 3, 1953. Tim’s very small part as a bartender begins at about the 10:35 mark. Don’t blink!

The episode also stars Virginia Lee (D.O.A. [1950]); Brad Johnson (Bedtime for Bonzo [1951]); and Helen Brown (Shane [1953]). Also appearing are two of Ed Wood‘s favorite character players, Lyle Talbot and Kenne Duncan. Enjoy!

Happy Belated Birthday Anniversary, Timothy!

Holy cow, folks. I really dropped the ball on this one. Timothy’s 88th birthday anniversary was last Saturday, March 11. I truly apologize for not posting that day. I promise to get back to posting on the regular. Life has been crazy lately, not to mention I had a portable hard drive meltdown a while back and it’s taken me some time to round up my screen shots. Things will be getting back to semi-normal around here soon! In the meantime, just ponder the fact that Tim would be 88 years old now.

 

Happy Halloween!

In what is turning out to be my annual Halloween pic, here once again is Timothy costumed as Frankenstein’s monster for the legendary early 1980s Sambo’s commercial that has apparently disappeared into the ether. It’s become my personal Holy Grail of Careyana. (Many thanks to Romeo Carey for including this in the work-in-progress documentary! That’s him on Tim’s left.)

Tim as Frankenstein's monster

Wishing you all a bang-up Halloween, just as Tim would have celebrated it! Stay safe and have fun!

Quote of the Week

THE WORLD’S GREATEST SINNER.  And  possibly the World’s Greatest Movie! Timothy Carey has the kind of flat-out sensual, deliberate brilliance that can scare the life out of a strong man. Like anyone who’s had the good fortune to experience this mammoth film…written, produced, directed and starring Mr. Carey… I’m in line to touch the hem of his garment. The awesome bombardment of philosophical / psychological / metaphysical messages in this tour de force goes 3-d one better, so to speak-this is the one film that not only SAYS IT ALL, but also manages to deliver the real truth about rock & roll and its place in a wildly undulating universe. To rockin’ rollin’ KICKS readers, TWGS is the ultimate R&R movie. To Joe Blow in the corn belt, it’s an incredible fast paced thriller with the wildest twists this side of Chubby Checker! Early on, we see leading man Carey as Clarence Hilliard, checking out a crazed crowd at a wild R&B show. Inspired, he takes up the guitar, changes his name to “God”, sports up in a fantastic gold lame suit (with “God” embroidered on the cuffs), and starts thrilling millions with his screaming rock & roll, dancing and preaching. With power, he becomes corrupt and careless, and the thrust of the film becomes a bizarre probe into the soul of man. The power and the glory of Carey’s performance come in the fact that, try as you may, you can’t bring yourself to believe that he is merely acting. Timothy Carey is, truly, genius personified. The movie is not only recommended, its required. Oh, and check this out, the title song is a reckless, stomping, lo-brow ’61 audio blaster that rates easily in KICKS HQ Top Ten Of All Time, even tho everybody here says pee-yew about the guy responsible for it – Frank Zappa!                                            
Miriam Linna, Kicks Magazine, 1992

The World's Greatest Sinner